Real Reform Amendment as passed by the New Hampshire House of Representatives February 9, 2017 by a vote of 211 to 75

HR 7 – AS INTRODUCED 2017

SESSION 17-0164 03/01 HOUSE RESOLUTION 7

A RESOLUTION calling on the United States Senate and House of Representatives to consider a constitutional amendment prohibiting campaign contributions unless the donor is eligible to vote in that federal election.

SPONSORS: Rep. McConnell, Ches. 12; Rep. Read, Rock. 17; Rep. O’Day, Ches. 11; Rep. Oxenham, Sull. 1; Rep. Darrow, Graf. 17

COMMITTEE: State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs

ANALYSIS This resolution calls on the United States Senate and House of Representatives to consider a constitutional amendment prohibiting campaign contributions unless the donor is eligible to vote in that federal election.

HR 7 – AS INTRODUCED 17-0164 03/01 STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE In the Year of Our Lord Two Thousand Seventeen A RESOLUTION calling on the United States Senate and House of Representatives to consider a constitutional amendment prohibiting campaign contributions unless the donor is eligible to vote in that federal election. Whereas, the Real Reform Amendment is a proposed federal constitutional amendment providing that: No campaign contributions may be made to any federal primary or general election campaign unless the donor, at the time of said contribution, is eligible to vote in that election. Organizations or individuals located outside the federal jurisdiction holding a given election may not engage in paid advertising by any means of communication, and may not provide paid personnel, or volunteers ineligible to vote in the election whose expenses are reimbursed. These organizations may, however, notify their membership of their endorsement or opinions of candidates by any non-public means of communication without restriction. State or regional affiliates of such organizations whose area of responsibility includes the federal jurisdiction holding the election, may publicly endorse and provide non-financial support to federal candidates. An individual’s donated time under this amendment will not be considered a contribution. Nothing in this amendment may restrict the offering of opinions on the merits of individual candidates, political issues, or any other matter bearing upon a campaign by any publicly accessible news organization or forum, or restrict the offering of opinions by members of the general public now; therefore, be it Resolved by the House of Representatives: That the house of representatives calls on the United States Senate and House of Representatives to consider the Real Reform Amendment. That the house clerk forward a copy of this resolution to the members of the New Hampshire Congressional Delegation.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOLLOW

Real Reform Amendment FAQs

Real Reform Amendment FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: How does the Real Reform Amendment differ from other proposals?

Answer: The Real Reform Amendment favors no party or interest group, nor does it necessitate any stance for or against other proposals. Because the Real Reform Amendment limits political contributions to those eligible to vote in their federal jurisdiction, it empowers voters in each state and congressional district by eliminating the ability of interests outside that state or congressional district to financially influence federal candidates.

Question: Does the Real Reform Amendment limit the amount a voter in their state or congressional district can contribute to a candidate?

Answer: No, there is no change to the amount a voter is limited to contributing to a candidate in his or her state or congressional district. Currently, the Federal Election Commission sets the allowable limit an individual voter can contribute. In 2016, that limit was $2,700 to primary candidates and $2,700 to general election candidates. Because the Real Reform Amendment eliminates Political Action Committees and Independent Expenditures, the limits set by the Federal Election Committee would apply to all contributions.

Question: If I understand the Real Reform Amendment properly, it prohibits Political Action Committees, Independent Expenditures, and any contributions except the above noted $2,700 contributions made by a constituent voter. Is that correct?

Answer: Yes.

Question: Do these limits apply to races for governor, state senator, state representative, county office, and/or municipal office?

Answer: No, these limits only apply to federal races. Each state has the ability to establish its own laws limiting contributions to those races.

Question: How would these limits affect a presidential race?

Answer: The Real Reform Amendment limits contributions to those voters eligible to vote for president. Just as it is now, voters would be permitted to contribute up to the amount set by the Federal Election Commission. That is to say $2,700 to primary candidates and $2,700 to general election candidates.

For further information contact New Hampshire State Representative James W. McConnell at    Jim.McConnell@leg.state.nh.us